News

Managerial support for depressed employees linked to fewer days off work

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 18:40
The provision of managerial support and help for employees with depression is linked to lower rates of workplace absenteeism, finds an international survey study of practice in 15 countries in different regions of the world, published in the online journal BMJ Open.

A scientific study characterises our circles of friendships

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 15:36
On average, there are three to five people in our lives with whom we have a very close relationship (close friends and/or family), around ten with whom we have close friendships, a larger group of about 30-35 people with whom we frequently interact and around one hundred acquaintances we come into contact with every now and then in our daily lives. In other words, we interact on a regular basis with about 150 people. This number is known as the "Dunbar number" and it indicates the amount of friends that our brain can handle, according to the theory formulated in the 1990's by Robin Dunbar, a professor of anthropology at Oxford University, who also participates in this new scientific study.

How students view intelligence affects how they internalize stress

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 13:50
As students transition into high school, many see their grades drop. And while some students are resilient in the midst of this challenge, others succumb to the pressure. How they think about themselves and their abilities could make the difference, according to adolescent psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Rochester.

Slacking on your savings? Cognitive bias could be to blame

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 13:49
Despite working hard, Americans are notoriously poor at saving money. The average American working-age couple has saved only $5,000 for retirement, while 43 percent of working-age families have no retirement savings at all, according to a 2016 analysis of a Federal Reserve survey.

Writing the future of rewritable memory

Quantum Physics News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 12:19
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Surprising findings on the physics of water entry could lead to smarter design of ships

General Physics - 月, 07/23/2018 - 12:18
Countless times a day, seabirds dive-catch prey from the ocean, boats enter the water from dry land, and seaplanes touch down gently amid the waves. The phenomenon of objects entering water is commonplace, yet a full understanding of the physics of water entry remains elusive, especially as it pertains to instances where a solid object enters a body of water that contains other solid objects, such as a gull diving into a rocky patch of sea.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Ytterbium: The quantum memory of tomorrow

Quantum Physics News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 11:00
Quantum communication and cryptography are the future of high-security communication. But many challenges lie ahead before a worldwide quantum network can be set up, including propagating the quantum signal over long distances. One of the major challenges is to create memories with the capacity to store quantum information carried by light. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, in partnership with CNRS, France, have discovered a new material in which an element, ytterbium, can store and protect the fragile quantum information even while operating at high frequencies. This makes ytterbium an ideal candidate for future quantum networks, where the aim is to propagate the signal over long distances by acting as repeaters. These results are published in the journal Nature Materials.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

When political ideology shapes luxury buying

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 08:50
Political allegiance plays a critical role in the decision to buy luxury goods. New empirical research by David Dubois, associate professor of marketing at INSEAD, Jeehye Christine Kim of Hong Kong UST Business School and Brian Park of J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University, shows that conservative shoppers are much more likely than their liberal counterparts to purchase luxury items if and when they believe the purchase will help them maintain their social status.

Researchers report success with complex quantum states

Quantum Physics News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 08:00
Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have, for the first time, succeeded in producing, controlling and understanding complex quantum states based on two electron spins connected to a superconductor. The result has been published in Nature Communications, and has come about in a collaboration between the scientists of the Niels Bohr Institute, a scientist from abroad and last, but not least, a Master's thesis student.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Current noises of Majorana fermions

Quantum Physics News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 07:57
Majorana fermions are particles that are their own antiparticles. In condensed matter physics, zero-energy Majorana fermions obey non-abelian statistics, and can be used in fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. They are thus the subject of extensive studies. However, as Majorana fermions carry no electric charge, detecting them experimentally is still a challenge. A current noise study now provides a direct method for the detection of these novel particles.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

America is in the middle of a battle over the meaning of words like 'diversity'

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 07:50
You might think that the culture war over race and immigration primarily transpires in dramatic events, like the woman who climbed the Statue of Liberty to protest Trump's child detention policy or the events in Charlottesville last summer.

Research reveals 'crucial' importance of gender balance in bank boards

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 07:00
Women in senior leadership roles in the financial services sector behave in a way that may have made the global banking crisis less likely to happen, according to a University research study.

Researchers pinpoint best locations for cameras

Social Sciences News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 06:40
Like in real estate, the most important factors in preventing crime with video cameras are location, location, location, new UT Dallas research has found.

Physicists demonstrate new method to make single photons

Quantum Physics News - 月, 07/23/2018 - 05:00
Scientists need individual photons for quantum cryptography and quantum computers. Leiden physicists have now experimentally demonstrated a new production method. Publication in Physical Review Letters on July 23rd.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

World's fastest man-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics

Quantum Physics News - 金, 07/20/2018 - 16:49
Researchers have created the fastest man-made rotor in the world, which they believe will help them study quantum mechanics.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Most employees can work smarter, given the chance

Social Sciences News - 金, 07/20/2018 - 12:20
More than half (58 percent) of employees in Britain can identify changes at work which would make them more productive, a research team drawn from UCL Institute of Education (IOE), Cardiff University and Nuffield College, Oxford has found.

Unusual sound waves discovered in quantum liquids

General Physics - 金, 07/20/2018 - 11:19
Ordinary sound waves—small oscillations of density—can propagate through all fluids, causing the molecules in the fluid to compress at regular intervals. Now physicists have theoretically shown that in one-dimensional quantum fluids not one, but two types of sound waves can propagate. Both types of waves move at approximately the same speed, but are combinations of density waves and temperature waves.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Unusual sound waves discovered in quantum liquids

Quantum Physics News - 金, 07/20/2018 - 11:19
Ordinary sound waves—small oscillations of density—can propagate through all fluids, causing the molecules in the fluid to compress at regular intervals. Now physicists have theoretically shown that in one-dimensional quantum fluids not one, but two types of sound waves can propagate. Both types of waves move at approximately the same speed, but are combinations of density waves and temperature waves.
カテゴリー: Physics News from Phys.org

Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds

Social Sciences News - 金, 07/20/2018 - 10:23
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown.

Who needs science advice anyway? Governments, for one

Social Sciences News - 金, 07/20/2018 - 10:20
There has been much consternation within the Ontario research community since Premier Doug Ford summarily dismissed the province's first chief scientist, Molly Shoichet, after she'd been in the job for only six months.

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